Masters Odds & Betting

Getting Started

Diamond Sportsbook offers non-stop, 24-hour poker action, against real people, for cash, or just for fun. Getting started is easy! Just follow the simple steps below and within minutes, you can take a seat at the tables!

Open an Account and Register a Poker Screen Name

The first thing you need to do is open a Diamond Sportsbook account and register a poker screen name. It only takes a few minutes to complete using our simple one page registration form.

Download the Free Poker Software

Click the button below to download our free software.

Download Poker Software

After clicking the download link, your download should start automatically within the next 5 seconds.

Deposit Funds

Make a deposit through our safe and secure cashier. All funds credited to your Diamond Sportsbook account can be transferred to the poker room at any time.

Transfer Funds to Poker

You will need to transfer funds from your Diamond Sportsbook account to the poker room to play for real money. Go to the cashier and click on the 'Transfer' box. You can then select the desired amount of money from your sports account to bring into the poker room. After you've finished playing you can leave the balance in poker room or move the money back into your sports account to wager.

Log In

Double click on the DSI poker icon on your desktop. Enter your Diamond Sportsbook account number (not your chosen player nickname) as well as your password.

Take a Seat

Select a table in the lobby for the type of game you would like to play. To join the table, simply click on an open seat at the table and then follow the instructions on the screen to buy in to the game.

Please note if you are connected using a public or shared computer, to prevent unauthorized access to your account when you have finished playing at the tables, please click on 'File' in the top left hand corner of the screen and select 'Log out and exit', or simply close the poker client to log out from the poker client and close the poker room.

We hope to see you at the tables soon!

Poker School

Texas Hold'em Poker for Beginners
  • Introduction

  • If you're new to Hold'em then you've found the right page. Hopefully, by reading our beginner's strategy guide, you'll be able to enjoy your poker more and start making a little profit along the way.

  • Starting Hands
    Probably the most important factor for any variation of poker is to select good starting hands to play. If you continually play bad or too many starting hands you're going to be a loser in the long run. Here are the starting hands we recommend:

  • (s = suited, X = card lower than 10)

  • Group One

    • A-A
    • K-K
    • Q-Q
    • J-J
    • T-T
    • A-Ks
    • A-K
    • A-Qs
    • A-Js
  • Group Two

    • 9-9
    • 8-8
    • 7-7
    • 6-6
    • A-Q
    • A-J
    • A-10s
    • A-10
    • K-Qs
    • K-Js
    • Q-Js
    • J-Ts
  • Group Three

    • 5-5
    • 4-4
    • 3-3
    • 2-2
    • A-Xs
    • K-Q
    • K-J
    • Q-J
    • J-T
    • T-9s
    • 9-8s
    • 8-7s
    • 7-6s
    • 6-5s
    • 5-4s
  • Position

  • Position is a big factor in Texas Hold'em, probably more so than in any other poker game. To act last or late in a betting round is a tremendous advantage, as you can see all that has gone before and have more information to base your decisions on.

  • If you're in early position then you should only be looking at playing hands in group one. From middle position you can also play hands in group two and from late position you can safely play hands from all three groups.

  • Be Aggressive

  • A controlled aggressive style is a winning style. Don't be afraid to bet or raise when you think you have the best of it. If you find yourself calling too many bets, ask yourself: Should I really be calling if I can't raise?

  • Bluffing

  • The beauty of poker is that you don't have to have the best hand to win. If you sense weakness in your opponents, why not try a bluff? It doesn't matter what cards you hold, sometimes you can win the pot with a bluff.

  • However, you should choose the right moment and the right opponent when attempting a bluff. As you gain playing experience you will be able to recognize when it is correct to try a bluff.

  • Also, when you bluff, be sure to bet enough. For example, if there is $100 in the pot it's no good making a $20 bluff as you are likely to be called. Bet the full amount of the pot if you want your bluff to be successful. That's why it takes a lot of courage to pull off a successful bluff!

  • Money Management / Game Selection

  • Never play with money you can't afford to lose and don't play in a game where the stakes are too high for you. If necessary put your name on the waiting list for the game you want to play. Don't play a game you're uncomfortable with just because there is an open seat.

  • Recommended Reading

  • If you want to learn more about playing Texas Hold'em we recommend the following books that have been written by some of the best players in the game today:

  • Hold'em Poker, David Sklansky
    Hold'em Poker for Advanced Players, David Sklansky
    Super System 2, Doyle Brunson
    Championship Hold'em, T.J. Cloutier and Tom McEvoy
    Harrington on Hold'em (1,2 & 3), Dan Harrington
    Internet Texas Hold'em, Matthew Hilger

Omaha Poker for Beginners
  • Introduction

  • So you've learnt the ins and outs of Texas Hold'em and now you want to get your hands on four cards instead of two� Well, you've come to the right place! Let's take a look at some basic Omaha strategy.

  • Starting Hands

  • Starting hand selection is probably more important in Omaha as having four hole cards instead of two will mean that you'll probably catch a little bit of the flop and your hand could become hard to get away from and wind up costing you a lot of money if you have second best.

  • As there are so many different starting hands in Omaha there aren't any pre-defined groups of hands to play and not play. The general rule is that all four cards must be connected in some way. Here are some examples of good starting hands:

    • Ac-Ad-Kc-Kd
    • Ac-Ad-Jc-10d
    • Kc-Kd-Qs-Qc
    • 7c-8c-9d-10d
    • 5c-6d-6c-7d
  • As you can see with the above examples, all the cards are connected. It also helps if you have suited cards and obviously two suits are better than one. Let's take a look at a couple more examples:

    • Kc-Qc-Jc-2d
    • 10c-10d-9c-5c
  • In these examples we have what we call a 'dangler', a card that is not connected to the rest of the hand. This makes the hand marginal as you have in effect, only three working cards. You can also see that three of the cards are of the same suit. This further devalues the hands because it makes it less likely to make a flush.

  • Be careful early on

  • In Omaha, even if you have the best hand before the flop or on the flop, you should play it very carefully as things can change fast. With everyone having four hole cards there are so many extra possibilities, so even if you have the best hand you can be sure that someone is drawing to beat you.

  • In Pot Limit Omaha you don't need to worry about building a pot. The pots get big all by themselves. You don't want to build a big pot early on with the best hand only for the board to change and then face a big bet later on that you can't call.

  • Then pounce on the turn

  • If you have the best hand on the turn, this is the time to pounce. Put in a big pot sized bet or raise and your opponents will have trouble calling you. And if they do then they're getting a very bad price trying to draw to beat you with only one card to come.

  • Bluffing

  • Bluffing is less of a factor in Omaha but it does happen. One bluff you might want to try is the 'bare ace bluff' where there is a possible flush on the board and you only have the ace of that suit in your hand. As you have four hole cards it is quite possible that you have two cards of that suit. However, pick your spots carefully and remember that you can't bluff a bad player!

  • Recommended Reading

  • If you want to learn more about playing Omaha we recommend the following books that have been written by some of the best players in the game today:

  • Championship Omaha, T.J. Cloutier and Tom McEvoy
    Super System 2, Doyle Brunson

Omaha High/Low Poker for Beginners
  • Introduction

  • Although Omaha High - Low is a split pot game, you should be working out how you can get all of the pot, not just half of it. Here are some tips that might help you do just that!

  • Starting Hands

  • Starting hand selection is probably more important in Omaha as having four hole cards instead of two will mean that you'll probably catch a little bit of the flop and your hand could become hard to get away from and wind up costing you a lot of money if you have second best.

  • As there are so many different starting hands in Omaha there aren't any pre-defined groups of hands to play and not play. The general rule is that all four cards must be connected in some way. Here are some examples of good starting hands:

    • Ac-Ad-Kc-Kd
    • Ac-Ad-Jc-10d
    • Kc-Kd-Qs-Qc
    • 7c-8c-9d-10d
    • 5c-6d-6c-7d
  • As you can see with the above examples, all the cards are connected. It also helps if you have suited cards and obviously two suits are better than one. Let's take a look at a couple more examples:

    • Kc-Qc-Jc-2d
    • 10c-10d-9c-5c
  • In these examples we have what we call a 'dangler', a card that is not connected to the rest of the hand. This makes the hand marginal as you have in effect, only three working cards. You can also see that three of the cards are of the same suit. This further devalues the hands because it makes it less likely to make a flush.

  • Be careful early on

  • In Omaha, even if you have the best hand before the flop or on the flop, you should play it very carefully as things can change fast. With everyone having four hole cards there are so many extra possibilities, so even if you have the best hand you can be sure that someone is drawing to beat you.

  • In Pot Limit Omaha you don't need to worry about building a pot. The pots get big all by themselves. You don't want to build a big pot early on with the best hand only for the board to change and then face a big bet later on that you can't call.

  • Then pounce on the turn

  • If you have the best hand on the turn, this is the time to pounce. Put in a big pot sized bet or raise and your opponents will have trouble calling you. And if they do then they're getting a very bad price trying to draw to beat you with only one card to come.

  • Bluffing

  • Bluffing is less of a factor in Omaha but it does happen. One bluff you might want to try is the 'bare ace bluff' where there is a possible flush on the board and you only have the ace of that suit in your hand. As you have four hole cards it is quite possible that you have two cards of that suit. However, pick your spots carefully and remember that you can't bluff a bad player!

  • Recommended Reading

  • If you want to learn more about playing Omaha we recommend the following books that have been written by some of the best players in the game today:

  • Championship Omaha, T.J. Cloutier and Tom McEvoy
    Super System 2, Doyle Brunson

  • Starting Hands

  • To give yourself the best chance of scooping the pot you need to select the correct starting hands to play. Good starting hands contain both high and low cards. Hands with middle cards (6,7,8 and 9) are useless in this game and should not be played. Here are some examples of good starting hands:

    • Ac-Ad-2c-3d
    • As-Kh-2h-3s
    • Ac-2c-3d-4d
    • Ac-Kd-Qs-2c
  • With both high and low cards you can win both ends of the pot. It also helps to have suited cards, especially aces suited with another small card, as you can make what is know as nut-nut. This means having the best possible low hand and the best possible high hand.

  • You can also play hands that contain just high cards (ten and up), but be prepared to throw it away if the flop comes with two or more low cards.

  • Play on the Flop

  • The texture of the flop and how it relates to your hand will decide if you carry on with the hand to the end or if you fold right there. Your decisions on the flop go a long way to determining if you will be a winner or a loser at the game in the long run. If you follow these simple rules about play on the flop you're more likely to be a winner:

    • If you have low cards and the flop contains only one low card do not chase the low;
    • If you have high cards and the flop is all low cards then it's not worth continuing as the best you can win is half the pot; and
    • If there are more than two people in the pot it is likely that someone is drawing to the best low so you don't want to draw to a second or third best low.
  • Getting Quartered

  • Another factor you should be aware of in Omaha High - Low is the danger of being quartered. This is when two players tie for the best low hand resulting in each player only getting a quarter of the pot - it happens quite frequently! So be careful in multi-way pots as it is common for more than one person to have the nut low.

  • Recommended Reading

  • If you want to learn more about playing Omaha High - Low we recommend the following books that have been written by some of the best players in the game today:

  • Championship Omaha, T.J. Cloutier and Tom McEvoy
    Super System 2, Doyle Brunson
    High - Low Split Poker, Ray Zee

Tournament Strategy for Beginners
  • Introduction

  • Poker tournaments are an entirely different proposition to ring (cash) games. If you lose all your chips in a ring game, you can always buy more. In a tournament you can't, so you'd better be careful not to lose them!

  • There are three distinct stages to a tournament. Let's look at them individually:

  • Early Stages

  • In the early stages of a tournament the blinds are relatively small compared to your chip stack, so you can afford to take your time and be selective about what hands you play. Although some players will play almost any two cards because the blinds are so small, this isn't a winning strategy and they'll quickly go broke. You'll also see players open the pot for a raise of 10 or 20 times the big blind. This is not good play as it over commits them to the pot and offers good value for an opponent to call on a drawing or marginal hand. We recommend raising approximately 3 times the big blind no matter what the big blind may be. If there are a couple of callers in front of you, then you can go ahead and raise 4 or 5 times the big blind, but no more than that.

  • Middle Stages

  • By the middle stage of tournaments most of the weak players will already be eliminated and play will have settled down. At this point you should loosen up a bit and try to accumulate some chips. The blinds are also higher now and become worth stealing. Your goal is to build a big enough chip stack so that you'll be able to make the final table.

  • Late Stages

  • Okay, so now there aren't too many players left and you can start to smell the money. You must decide if you're content with just getting into the prize paying positions or want to go on and try and win the whole thing. If you have a short stack and just want to make the money, then play tight and wait till you're in the money before you take a few risks. If your goal is to win the tournament then there are a lot of chips to be won by being aggressive as the aforementioned short stacks just trying to make it into the money are easy prey.

  • At the final table, look to knock out the short stacks to jump up the prize ladder. Be aggressive and take some risks, especially as it gets short handed.

  • The above strategy tips are for a multi table tournament but translate to a single table sit and go as well. Imagine when you start a ten person sit and go that it is just like the early stages above, when it's down to six or seven players it's the middle stages and when there are four or less players it is the late stages.

  • Recommended Reading

  • If you want to learn more about playing Tournaments we recommend the following books that have been written by some of the best players in the game today:

  • Tournament Poker, Tom McEvoy
    Tournament Poker for Advanced Players, David Sklansky

  • Good luck in your tournament play at Diamond SportsBook!

Guide to Starting Hands in Texas Hold'em Poker
  • Introduction

  • Guide to Starting Hands

  • When you decide to play a starting hand in Texas Hold'em, you should be thinking about the showdown before you call your first bet. How do different hands win in a showdown?

  • AA, KK, QQ, JJ

  • The most common road to victory is a simple pair. This makes high pairs (i.e. AA, KK, QQ, JJ) very strong hands. These hands do best against fewer players. When you start the hand, you probably have the best hand, but there are more cards that help your opponents than those that help you.

  • Consider your KK hand - there are only 2 kings that can improve your hand, whereas the other players will have many more to help them get 2 pairs, a straight or a flush. When you have the best hand, you should always aim to raise and re-raise so that other players must pay to have a chance to improve their hand.

  • On any hand other than AA, be prepared to abandon it if overcards hit the flop and there is a lot of betting action. It is painful to fold pocket Queens, but not as painful as sweetening the pot for the guy who wins with a pair of Aces.

  • AKs, AK, AQs, AQ, AJs, KQs, KJs, JTs

  • These are very strong hands, with big hit potential. You will almost always call with these hands, and often raise depending on your position and what action other players have taken at the table. In addition to winning with a high pair, you can often hit a straight or a flush. When you hit a straight and there are lots of high cards on the board, you'll often see a lot of betting, which makes this hand very profitable.

  • You should be aware that it is remotely possible that your hand is dominated (i.e. you have AQ, your opponent has AK, and there is an ace on the board). Such hands can be very costly to lose, which can justify folding AQ or worse if there are a couple of raises before you.

  • Even though these are fantastic starting hands, you have to be prepared to abandon them if the flop misses you completely and you are up against several players.

  • AJ, ATs, KQ, KJ, KTs, QTs, J9s

  • These are medium strength hands that are easy to fold before the flop against a raise. You hope to hit a straight or a flush for a monster hand. Be very careful if you hit two-pair though - when there are a lot of high cards on the board, other players might have hit a straight. If you don't have a high pair or straight/flush draw, be prepared to toss the hand quickly and cheaply. If you have just a single pair, be cautious if you are raised - that player might have the same pair with a better kicker.

  • TT, 99, 88, 77, 66, 55, 44, 33, 22

  • When you play a mid-low pair, you want to see the flop cheaply and hope to hit a set (3 of a kind). The odds of you hitting the set are 6.5:1. If you hit it, you have a monster hand and can play it aggressively. If the flop misses you and there are cards higher than yours on the board, be prepared to fold if someone bets into you.

  • 89s, 78s, 67s, 56s, 45s

  • Suited connectors are long-shot hands. It's very unlikely that you'll win with a single pair, so you're playing for a straight or a flush. You're a large underdog anytime you play hands like these, but they can cash in big. An important thing to remember when playing these hands is that you want lots of opponents, so that when your hand hits, it pays well.

  • You can call these hands in a late position if no one has raised, and you expect at least 4-5 people to see the flop. You generally don't want to play these hands from an early or middle position, because you could face a raise before seeing the flop.

  • If you hit your flush and another player keeps re-raising you, realize that he could have a higher flush. Don't let your fear of a higher flush allow you to give other players free cards if you hit your flush though - if a fourth flush card hits the board, other players are much more likely to hit their own flush.

  • A9s-A2s, K9s-K5s, Q9s-Q5s, J8s, T8s, 97s, 86s, 75s, 64s, 53s

  • These �other suited hands� are marginal. You are hoping to hit your flush, or perhaps you even have one possible straight. With A5, you have only one possible straight: 2-3-4. Meanwhile, a hand like J10 has 4 possible straights. A little distance between your connectors greatly reduces the strength of the hand. While it helps that your hand is suited, this is not reason alone to play the hand. A suited hand is only 2% more likely to win than an unsuited hand.

  • These hands are sometimes played from the small blind or big blind, or when in late position if your table is loose and passive.

  • Anything else

  • A hand like K6 or 10-4 is junk. You need two pair or a three of a kind to have a realistic chance of wining. There are times you might call as the small blind, but otherwise you don't ever want to pay to play these hands.

Guide to Position
  • Introduction

  • Guide to Position

  • Position or seating position refers to how far a player is sitting from the button or dealer. This is a critical concept, because the earlier you act, the more likely it is that someone acting after you will have a better hand. If your position is later, it is easier to evaluate the hand since you have had the opportunity to see more players make their decisions.

  • You need better hands to call if you are acting in the early position. If you are the first to act, 9 people will have a chance to call or raise after you. If you are the last to act in the late position, you know exactly how many people have called and whether any have shown strength by raising. Consequently, you can play much weaker hands if you are late to act, especially if no one has implied that they have a strong hand by raising.

  • Position is particularly important in no-limit or pot-limit Texas Hold'em. In these types of games your initial call might face a huge raise forcing you to fold, or pay more than you intended to see the flop. If you are last to act, you know exactly how much you'll have to pay to see the flop.

  • Bluffing

  • It is easier to bluff if you are in late position. If everyone checks to you, their play suggests they do not have a strong hand. When an opponent shows weakness, it is a prime time to bluff. If you are against one or two opponents, your bet after their checks might win the pot right there!

  • Another technique that is strong from a late position is the �semi-bluff�. When you are betting a �semi-bluff�, you probably do not have the best hand. However, you usually have quite a few ways to make a much stronger hand - i.e. drawing to a flush or open ended straight. A semi-bluff can win the hand just like a normal bluff, but it has an additional advantage: If your hand improves, it is harder for other players to determine what you have.

  • Don't bluff too often. If players believe you bluff too often, they might check to you with a strong hand and raise when you bet. This is called a �Check-Raise� and is a deadly tool against bluffs or players betting with weak hands.

  • Tight or loose game

  • A tight game is one where very few players are seeing the flop. In a 10-player game, most flops might see only two or three players. In a loose game, many players are calling to see the flop - often five or more.

  • If you are playing in a loose game and there is not much raising, position becomes less important. If you have a hand like 9D-10D, you could play this from early position if you are not likely to be raised. If there is a lot of raising before the flop, you have to be more conservative in the hands you play, especially from an early position.

  • Loose or tight players

  • If you can identify the players around you, you gain an advantage. For example, if you know that tight players are less likely to call, you can play more liberally if many of the players acting after you are tight. You can also try to steal blinds from tight players if it is you versus tight players in the blinds. Knowing a player is loose helps you also - if you can count on that player calling, you can play weaker hands that have flush/straight potential, knowing the odds will justify your call.

Hand Ranking

Poker Hands & Hand Rankings

Poker Hand Rankings
  • Poker Hand Rankings

  • Royal Flush - 10, Jack, Queen, King, Ace, all of the same suit.

  • Royal Flush
  • Straight Flush - Any five cards in succession, all of the same suit (i.e. 8-9-10-Jack-Queen, all of hearts). Between 2 Straight-flushes, the one with the highest card wins (i.e. 10-9-8-7-6 of Hearts beats 8-7-6-5-4 of Spades).

  • Royal Flush
  • 4 of a Kind - Four of the same card, i.e. 4 Aces and any other card. If 2 players both have a 4 of a kind, the higher ranking 4 of a kind wins the pot - i.e. 4 Jacks beat 4 Eights. If both have the same 4 of a kind (i.e. 4 10s are on the board), the highest kicker wins.

  • Royal Flush
  • Full House - 3 of a kind plus a pair, i.e. three 10's and 2 Jacks. If two or more players have a full house, the player with the highest 3 of a kind wins. If both players have the same 3 of a kind, the higher pair wins.

  • Royal Flush
  • Flush - Any 5 cards of the same suit. If more than one player has a flush, the player with the highest flush card wins - i.e. an ace-high flush beats a king-high flush.

  • Royal Flush
  • Straight - 5 cards in a row, irrespective of suit. If 2 players have a straight, the highest straight wins - i.e. an Ace-high straight beats a Queen-high straight. straight.jpg

  • Royal Flush
  • 3 of a Kind - 3 of any matching card, plus any other two cards. If two players have 3 of a kind, the highest 3 of a kind wins. If both players have the same 3 of a kind, the player with the highest kicker wins.

  • Royal Flush
  • 2 Pair - Any 2 pair. If two players have 2 pair, the one with the highest pair wins - i.e. Kings and Fours beat Jacks and Tens. If the high pair is tied, the higher second pair determines the winner. If they are still tied, the higher kicker wins.

  • Royal Flush
  • 1 Pair - One pair of any card, plus any other 3 cards. If more than one player has a pair, the higher pair wins. If both players have the same pair, the higher kicker wins.

  • Royal Flush
  • High Card - In the case of no pairs, the player with the highest ranking card wins.

  • Royal Flush
Poker Hand Nicknames
  • Poker Hand Nicknames

  • When you are playing poker online, reading an article or watching a televised tournament, you may come across names for hands that are unfamiliar to you. To help you learn the lingo of poker, we've compiled a glossary of common nicknames for poker hands.

    • AA - Pocket Rockets, Bullets, American Airlines
    • AK - Big Slick, Anna Kournikova
    • AQ - Little Slick, Big Chick
    • AJ - Blackjack, Ajax
    • A10 - Johnny Moss
    • A2 - Hunting Season
    • A3 - Ashtray, Baskin Robbins
    • KK - Cowboys, King Kong
    • KQ - Royal Wedding
    • KJ - Gay wedding
    • K9 - Canine, Fido
    • QQ - Ladies, Hilton Sisters
    • QJ - OJ
    • Q10 - Cutie
    • Q7 - Computer Hand
    • Q3 - Gay Waiter
    • JJ - Hooks, Jay Birds
    • JA - Jack Ass
    • JK - Harry Potter
    • JKo - Bachelor's Hand (say it out loud)
    • J4 - Flat Tire
    • 10, 2 - Doyle Brunson
    • 98 - Oldsmobile
    • 99 - Popeye's
    • 95 - Dolly Parton
    • 88 - Two Fat Ladies, Snowmen
    • 77 - Walking Sticks
    • 78 - RPMg
    • 76 - Union Oil
    • 69 - Big Lick, Dinner for Two
    • 57 - Heinz
    • 55 - Speed Limit
    • 66 - Route 66
    • 45 - Jesse James, Colt 45
    • 44 - Magnum
    • 22 - Ducks

Rake and Tournament Fees

Rake and Tournament Fees
  • Rake and Tournament Fees

  • The Rake is the scaled commission fee charged by the house for operating a poker game and is collected from most real money ring game pots (also known as cash games). Therefore the Rake is simply the amount of commission deducted as a percentage of each pot by the online poker room up to a pre-defined maximum amount.

  • Sit & Go and multi-table tournaments are not raked, but instead an entry fee is added to the cost of the buy-in for the tournament. The buy-in will go to the prize pool and the entry fee goes to the online poker room.

  • Diamond Sports Poker operates a "no flop, no drop" policy. This means that Diamond Sports Poker does not deduct rake from any community card poker game like online Texas Hold'em poker when no flop is dealt i.e. all players fold before the flop.

  • The rake structure for Diamond Sports Poker is available by clicking on the heading below.

Rake Structure for Diamond Sports Poker
  • The house charges a commission or "rake" as a percentage of the total pot won at the end of each hand. The rake is calculated based on the number of players in the hand, and the size of the pot. The commission (rake) is 5% and capped to a maximum of $3.

Poker Glossary

Add-on - Some tournaments allow players the opportunity at a certain point to buy additional chips, called an add-on. This is different from a rebuy, because usually everyone still in the tournament is able to add-on. Add-ons usually mark the end of the rebuy period

All-in - When a player puts the last of his or her chips into a pot, that player is said to be all-in. An all-in player is not eligible to win more money from any other player than what he had at the table before the pot. The all-in player will be eligible for the main pot and if other players bet more there will be a side-pot.

Ante - A small forced bet that everyone at the table is required to pay before each hand. In games with an ante, these bets constitute the initial pot.

Artificial All-in - A way to protect players from losses due to problems with the connection. If a player cannot act he will be treated as all-in if he has put money into the pot (if not his hand will be folded).

Bankroll - The total amount of money one player is willing (and able) to put at risk.

Bad Beat - The situation in which a very strong hand is beaten by an even stronger hand.

Bet - To bet is to be the first one to put money into the pot. Later action in a round is a call, raise or a re-raise.

Big Bet Poker - Pot-limit and no-limit poker are sometimes referred to as Big Bet Poker. The "Big" refers to the size of bets relative to the forced bets, irrespective of the amount of money involved. However, at our poker site we also call our big €100/€200 games "Big Bet Poker".

Big Blind - This is the larger of the two blind bets and is the size of a first round bet

Big Slick - Nickname for Ace-King

Blind - A compulsory bet that starts a game of poker, put in by the two players to the left of the dealer, the first player is the 'small blind', the second the 'big blind'

Board - The community cards on the table which everyone can see

Bottom Pair - The lowest pair available

Bring-in - A form of forced bet used mainly in forms of stud poker, and sometimes in combination with antes. The bring-in is usually decided by who has the highest - or lowest - card.

Button (dealer button) - Usually "the button" refers specifically to the dealer button, used to mark the dealer position, or the player playing in that position.

Buy-in - The amount of money with which you enter a game is your buy-in. In a non-tournament game, the buy-in is the amount you get in chips. In a tournament, your buy-in is the amount that you have to pay to enter and get your initial number of tournament chips.

Big Blind - A designated amount that is placed by the player sitting in the second position, clockwise from the dealer, before any cards are dealt. Players joining a game in progress must post a Big Blind, but may do so from any position.

Call - To call is to match the current bet. If there has been a bet of €10 and a raise of €10 then it costs €20 to call. When all bets in the current betting round has been called the betting round is over. Calling is the cheapest way to remain in a hand.

Calling Station - A player that calls a lot and hardly ever raises or folds

Check - If there has been no betting before you in a betting round, you may check, which is like calling a bet of €0, or passing your turn.

Check-Raise - To check and then raise when another player bets. This is usually performed by a player with a strong hand, with the intention of increasing the pot.

Community card(s) - Face-up cards that are shared by all the players in a hand. Flop games, like Texas Hold'em or Omaha, have five community cards.

Connector - A pocket hand that consists of two cards next to each other in value, i.e. 9s 10d

Deal - To deal is to give out the cards during a hand. The person who does this is called the dealer. To be dealt in is to be given cards during a hand. To be dealt out or dealt around is not to be given cards.

Deck - A set of playing-cards. In most games, the deck consists of 52 cards.

Discard - In a draw game, a card that was discarded and thrown away by a player, to be replaced by another card.

Draw - Draw games are games where at some point during the hand you are allowed to discard some or all of your cards, to be replaced from the deck.

Drawing hand - An incomplete, but potentially strong hand. This usually refers to a hand where you have 4 out of 5 cards to make a straight (straight draw) or a flush (flush draw).

Early Position - This describes players immediately to the left of the blinds, said to be 'early' as they are the first players to bet.

Fifth Street - Another name for the river, the fifth and final community card in Omaha and Texas Hold'em

Fish - A bad player

Five Card Stud Poker - Original stud poker game in which players receive their first card face down, but all four subsequent cards face up. A round of betting follows each card being individually dealt, which the best visible hand initiating betting.

Fixed limit - In limit poker, any betting structure in which the amount of the bet on each particular round is fixed and pre-set.

Flop - A number of games, such as Hold'em and Omaha, are played with five community cards. The first three of these cards are dealt all at once, and are called the flop. Games with a flop can be called flop games.

Flush - the poker hand consisting of five cards in the same suit.

Forced bet - A mandatory bet on the first round of play in a stud game, such as 7-card stud.

Fourth Street - 4th community card dealt after betting on the flop has finished.

Freeroll - Freeroll tournaments are tournaments with no entry fee or initial buy-in.

Freezeout - In tournament play, when the period for re-buys ends, the tournament becomes a Freezeout.

Full House - The poker hand consisting of one pair and three of a kind. E.g. 4-4-K-K-K (two fours and three kings). The strongest three of a kind decides which full house is the strongest. E.g. 2-2-A-A-A (two twos and three aces) beats Q-Q-K-K-K (two queens and three kings).

Gutshot - An inside straight draw. An example of a gutshot straight draw (also known as belly buster straight draw) is to have 4578, in an attempt to draw a 6

Heads-up - Play between only two players. Our card room offers special heads-up tables.

Hole Cards - Cards that only you can see (also called pocket cards), used with the board to create the best 5 card hand

Kicker - In draw poker, a side card (one of a different rank) held, when drawing, with a pair or three of a kind, to disguise the hand or to try to improve the hand. In Hold'em, the unpaired card that goes with a player's pair or three of a kind. Often, the rank of the kicker determines the winner of the pot.

Late Position - This describes players immediately to the right of the dealer button, said to be 'late' as they are one of the last people to bet

Limp - Calling a bet

Made Hand - A hand that does not need another card to improve it.

Main pot - When a player goes all-in in a table stakes game, that player is only eligible to win the main pot - the pot consisting of those bets the player were able to match. Additional bets, placed in a side pot, are contested among the remaining players.

Maniac - A person that bets, raises, re-raises and bluffs a lot.

Micro-limit - Small limit poker games, i.e. 5c/10c or 10c/25c

Muck - The pile of discarded cards or the act of putting cards in this pile (and therefore taking them out of play).

No-limit - A type of poker game in which you can bet any amount you like at any stage, including your entire stack

Nuts - The best possible hand at a given point in the game.

Offsuit - Two cards that are not of the same suit

Omaha - A community poker game where each player is dealt four cards and must make his best hand using exactly two of them, plus three of the five community cards.

Open-ended Straight - A hand with 4 cards which only needs a card at either 'end' to make a straight

Out - A card that will give you a winning hand

Overcard - A hole card that is higher than all the community cards on the board.

Overpair - Pocket pairs that are higher than the highest card on the board

Pair - Two card of the same rank. E.g. J-J.

Play the Board - A situation where the board is your only hand.

Pocket - Cards that only you can see (also called hole cards), used with the board to create the best 5 card hand

Pocket Pair - Holding two of the same value cards in your pocket cards

Position - The player's location relative to the dealer.

Post - Putting up a blind (small blind or big blind). If you miss playing the blind in a particular round, the house dealer asks if you want to post, that is, put in as many chips as are in the blind you missed. When the action gets to you, you have already called one bet, and, if the pot has not been raised, you do not have to put any more chips in the pot. You can, of course, raise in turn.

Pot - All the money in the middle of the poker table that goes to the winner of the hand is the pot.

Pot-Committed - A situation where, due to your previous bets and the size of your stack you are forced all-in.

Pot Limit - Betting structure of a game in which you are allowed to bet up to the amount of the pot.

Quads - 4 of a kind.

Rainbow - A flop that consists of three different suits.

Raise - After someone has opened betting in a round, to increase the amount of the bet is to raise. For example, if the betting limit is €5 and player A bets €5, player B can fold, call the €5, or raise it to €10.

Rake - Chips taken from the pot by the card room as payment for hosting the game.

Rank - Each card has a suit and a rank. A pair is two cards of the same rank.

Rebuy - When you first sit down at a game, you buy in with a certain amount of money. Rebuying is what you do when you buy more chips when you run out, so that you are not eliminated from a tournament. Rebuys are also allowed in some tournaments for players who fall below a certain point in chips. In most cases rebuys are allowed only up to a certain point in a tournament (normally 1 hour) and often limited to a fixed number of rebuys.

River (Fifth Street) - The last of five community cards in flop games, e.g. Texas Hold'em and Omaha is called the river. Sometimes it also called Fifth Street. Sometimes "river" is used to refer to the last card in non-flop games, such as seven card stud.

Rock - A very tight player who bets and raises only when he has a decent hand and is therefore fairly predictable

Royal Flush - A poker hand consisting of a straight flush from A-10 (Ace to ten). I.e. A-K-Q-J-10 (Ace-King-Queen-Jack-Ten) in the same suit.

Satellite - Tournaments that do not win you any money but let you play in a further game, usually for high stakes.

Second Pair - Second highest pair possible.

Semi-Bluff - A bet made which you hope will not be called but if it is you have a semi-decent hand to continue playing with, i.e. you hold 7h Qd and the board comes 7d 3h Jd

Set - 3 of a kind when you hold pocket pairs and a card of the same value lands on the board.

Seventh Street - The final community card (also see River) in seven card stud.

Short Stack - Having considerably less chips/money than other players at the table.

Showdown - When all the betting is done, the showdown is the process where all remaining players show their cards to determine who wins the hand.

Slow Play - To check or call with a strong hand with the aim of keeping more players in the pot.

Side pot - An auxiliary pot generated when one or more players run out of chips, and which those who ran out cannot win. This can lead to a situation in which the holder of the second-best (or worse) hand can win more money in a pot than the holder of the best hand.

Small Blind - The amount put in the pot by the person immediately to the left of the dealer "button" prior to the cards being dealt.

Split Pot - A pot that's shared between two or more players because their hand rankings are the same.

Spread Limit - Where the minimum bet on all betting rounds equals to the big blind. The maximum bet varies on the different rounds.

Stack - The amount of money you have in front of you on the poker table (i.e., stack of chips). A stack can also refer to a particular number of chips.

Steal the pot - To win a pot through bluffing.

Straight - The poker hand consisting of five cards in a straight rank order. E.g. 4-5-6-7-8.

Straight Flush - The poker hand consisting of a straight where all the cards are in the same suit.

Suit - One of the four groups of 13 cards into which a deck is divided: spades, hearts, diamonds and clubs.

Suited - A starting hand that contains two of the same suit, i.e. 4s 6s.

Table stakes - (1) The amount of money you have on the table. This is the maximum amount that you can lose or that anyone can win from you on any one hand. (2) The requirement that players can wager only the money in front of them at the start of a hand, and can only buy more chips between hands.

Three of a kind - Three cards of the same rank. E.g. Q-Q-Q (three Queens).

Tilt - To play recklessly by making bad calls, raises, going all-in with nothing etc.

Top Pair - Highest pair possible.

Top Set - Highest three of a kind possible.

Trey - Another term for a three e.g. trey of clubs.

Trips - 3 of a kind.

Turn (Fourth Street) - The fourth of five community cards in flop games, e.g. Texas Hold'em and Omaha is called the turn. Sometimes it is also called Fourth Street.

Under the Gun - Player that is first to bet, to the left of the big blind.

VIP Points - A weighted reward system based on rake contribution. One VIP point is awarded for each €0.40 been contributed in rake. VIP Points can be redeemed against buy-ins (see above).

Wheel - A straight of any suit from Ace to Five.