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2016 Masters Betting

The 2016 Masters gets underway on Thursday, April 7th at August National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia.  World #1 and defending champion Jordan Spieth is listed as a co-favorite along with Rory McIlroy at Masters odds of 7-1 with Jason Day a close third choice at odds of 8-1.  The big three are the only golfers listed at single-digit odds but there are a number of other contenders who could win golf’s first major of the year including past champions Adam Scott, Bubba Watson and Phil Mickelson.

Let’s take a look at 2016 Masters odds, top Masters contenders, Masters darkhorses, Masters facts, history and records and Masters predictions.

 

2016 Masters Odds

  • Jordan Spieth 7-1
  • Rory McIlroy 7-1
  • Jason Day 8-1
  • Bubba Watson 11-1
  • Adam Scott 12-1
  • Rickie Fowler 15-1
  • Phil Mickelson 16-1
  • Dustin Johnson 22-1
  • Justin Rose 26-1
  • Hideki Matsuyama 35-1
  • Henrik Stenson 35-1
  • Louis Oosthuizen 40-1
  • Danny Willett 50-1
  • Tiger Woods 52-1
  • Branden Grace 52-1
  • Patrick Reed 54-1
  • Brandt Snedeker 54-1
  • Sergio Garcia 55-1
  • Brooks Koepka 60-1
  • Charl Schwartzel 60-1
  • Justin Thomas 62-1
  • Paul Casey 64-1
  • Jimmy Walker 70-1
  • Matt Kuchar 75-1
  • Zach Johnson 75-1

All of the other players are listed with odds of 100-1 or more of they are part of the field.

 

Top Masters Contenders

When you look at the 2016 Masters you have to start with the big three of Spieth, McIlroy and Day.  Last year it was all Spieth until late in the season when Day took over.  This year it has been very much hit and miss for the big three as only Day has looked good but there is always the injury issue hovering around Day.  Spieth is the defending champion and if he finally gets his game in top form he is a deserving favorite.  The same could be said about McIlroy but we haven’t seen Rory’s top form in a while.  Day has outplayed both of them recently and if healthy, he probably should be favored.

Darkhorses

Adam Scott and Bubba Watson have actually outplayed the top three this year and they could easily be listed among the top contenders.  Both are previous Masters winners so there is no worry about them not playing well at Augusta.  Other darkhorse contenders include past winners Phil Mickelson and Charl Schwartzel who have each showed signs of top form this season.  And don’t forget about Bill Haas who nearly won at Valspar earlier this year and he is the same age at 34 when Phil Mickelson won his first major.

Other darkhorse candidates include Rickie Fowler who has won four times in the past 12 months, Dustin Johnson who has the power to overwhelm Augusta National, Hideki Matsuyama who finished in the top five a year ago and Justin Rose who has never missed a cut at Augusta.

Masters History and Facts

The Masters began in 1934 and is held at the Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia. The famous green jacket has been given out since 1949.  Jack Nicklaus holds the record for most Masters titles with six while Tiger Woods and Arnold Palmer won the tournament four times. The Masters is the first major of the year and is played in the second week of April. The tournament is an Invitational only event but all of the world’s top 50 players get an automatic entry. Former champions also get an automatic entry. The Masters has been televised on the weekend by CBS every year since 1956 with ESPN televising the action recently on Thursday and Friday.

The Masters was started by Clifford Roberts and Bobby Jones and was first known as the "Augusta National Invitational."  “The Masters” official name was not given to the tournament until 1939.

Recent Masters Winners

  • 2015 – Jordan Spieth
  • 2014 – Bubba Watson
  • 2013 – Adam Scott
  • 2012 – Bubba Watson
  • 2011 – Charl Schwartzel
  • 2010 – Phil Mickelson
  • 2009 – Angel Cabrera
  • 2008 – Trevor Immelman
  • 2007 – Zach Johnson

 

Masters Records

Most Wins

6 - Jack Nicklaus (1963, 1965, 1966, 1972, 1975, 1986)
4 - Arnold Palmer (1958, 1960, 1962, 1964)
4 - Tiger Woods (1997, 2001, 2002, 2005)

Wire-to-Wire Winners

Craig Wood (1941)
Arnold Palmer (1960)
Jack Nicklaus (1972)
Raymond Floyd (1976)
Jordan Spieth (2015)

Youngest Winners

Tiger Woods, 1997 (21 years, 3 months, 14 days)
Jordan Spieth, 2015 (21 years, 8 months)
Seve Ballesteros, 1980 (23 years, 4 days)

Oldest Winner

Jack Nicklaus, 1986 (46 years, 2 months, 23 days)

Most Top 5 Finishes

15 - Jack Nicklaus
11 - Tiger Woods
11 - Phil Mickelson

Most Top 10 Finishes

22 - Jack Nicklaus
17 - Ben Hogan
15 - Gary Player
15 - Sam Snead
15 - Tom Watson
15 - Phil Mickelson

Lowest Score, 18 Holes

63 - Nick Price, third round, 1986
63 - Greg Norman, first round, 1996

Lowest Score, 72 Holes

270 - Tiger Woods, 1997
270 - Jordan Spieth, 2015

2016 Masters Predictions

We’ll go with Adam Scott at odds of 12-1, Rickie Fowler at odds of 16-1 and Justin Rose at odds of 26-1.

Check out the latest Masters odds at BetDSI sportsbook.


2015 Masters Betting

The 2015 Masters gets underway on Thursday, April 9th at the Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia. All of the best golfers in the world are in the field with World #1 Rory McIlroy listed as the favorite. Rory will be looking to complete the career Grand Slam with a win at the Masters as he has already won the U.S. Open, British Open and PGA Championship. McIlroy is listed with odds of 4-1 to win the 2015 Masters. He is followed by Jason Day, Adam Scott, Bubba Watson and Jordan Spieth but all four of those golfers are listed with double-digit odds.

2015 Masters Odds and Contenders

Rory McIlroy is the favorite to win the 2015 Masters that gets underway on Thursday, April 9th. McIlroy is listed with odds of 4-1 and he is the only golfer listed with single-digit odds. McIlroy is the #1 ranked golfer in the world and there is no question that when he is playing his best that he will win. The problem for McIlroy is that he doesn’t always play his best as was evidenced earlier this season when he actually missed a cut.

After Rory there are a group of golfers who are listed with odds between 12-1 and 15-1. Jason Day is listed at 12-1 and he may end up going off as the second choice in the betting. Adam Scott, defending champion Bubba Watson and Jordan Spieth are each listed with odds of about 15-1.

2015 Masters Favorite

There is really one golfer who stands out and that is Rory McIlroy. He is the best golfer in the world and when he plays well he is not going to lose. He is not yet on the level of where Tiger Woods once was but he is getting closer. He is definitely getting the type of respect that Woods used to get in terms of the golf odds as he is the only golfer listed with single-digit odds. Rory has never won the Masters in five previous starts. If he can win this event he would complete the career Grand Slam.

Darkhorse Masters Contenders

Once you get past Rory there is a long list of contenders who could win the Masters. And no, none of them are named Tiger Woods. He has not played well in a long, long time and his health is such that he might not even play in the event. Even if he does play he would not be considered a threat.

Bubba Watson has won this tournament in two of the past three years but it is hard to see anyone winning back-to-back Masters. Adam Scott won the Masters two years ago and he is definitely capable of winning again. Jason Day is getting a lot of attention in Masters Odds and he could go off as the second choice behind McIlroy. Jordan Spieth is another up and coming young star who has the game to win at Augusta.

You may have noticed that Phil Mickelson is not among the top contenders because he has not shown winning form this year. He does have three career wins at Augusta so he can’t be entirely dismissed.

Live Longshots

Everyone else in the field is listed at 20-1 or more including live longshots Rickie Fowler, Patrick Reed, Jimmy Walker and Dustin Johnson. You can even get players like reigning FedExCup champion Billy Horschel at odds of 40-1 and Bill Haas at 80-1.

Masters Betting Notes

The Masters is the first of the four majors each year and played each year at the Augusta National Golf Club which is located in Augusta, Georgia. The current name of the tournament, The Masters was given to the tournament in 1939 and since 1949 the green jacket has been given to the champion.

You can bet on who you think will win the Masters but don’t forget that you can also bet Masters Matchups. The matchups are where you have one golfer matched up against another golfer. Instead of having to win the entire tournament, you just need your golfer to finish better than the other golfer to win your Masters bet. There are a lot of great Masters Matchups on the board at Diamond sportsbook including marquee matchups like Rory McIlroy vs. Adam Scott and Jason Day vs. Phil Mickelson.

Recent Masters Winners

  • 2014 – Bubba Watson
  • 2013 – Adam Scott
  • 2012 – Bubba Watson
  • 2011 – Charl Schwartzel
  • 2010 – Phil Mickelson
  • 2009 – Angel Cabrera
  • 2008 – Trevor Immelman
  • 2007 – Zach Johnson

2015 Masters Odds and Contenders

Rory McIlroy is the favorite to win the 2015 Masters that gets underway on Thursday, April 10th.  Tiger Woods was originally listed as the favorite but Tiger has not played well this year and he has had major issues with his back. There is a chance Tiger might not even play due to his balky back.  If he does go, Tiger would likely be the second or third choice in the betting.  McIlroy will likely go off as the favorite at about 7-1 in Masters odds at Diamond sportsbook.  Woods and Adam Scott would be right behind in Masters betting with odds of about 10-1.  Phil Mickelson would also be listed among the favorites with odds of 12-1.

2015 Masters Betting Favorites

There are really four golfers who can be considered favorites to win the 2015 Masters. They are Rory McIlroy, Tiger Woods, Adam Scott and Phil Mickelson.  They will be listed anywhere from 7-1 to 12-1.  Everyone else in the field will be listed at 15-1 or more.

Rory McIlroy
When he is on his game there is no question that McIlroy is one of the world’s top players.  He is currently ranked 7th in the world rankings.  He has the ability to dominate and win tournaments going away but he has been inconsistent.  He has had no success in the Masters with no wins in five career starts.

Tiger Woods
Tiger is still the number one ranked players in the world but he has not played well of late and his back has been so bad that he hasn’t even been able to finish at times.  He does have four wins in 19 starts in the Masters so he can’t be ruled out but Tiger hasn’t won a major in more than four years.

Adam Scott
He is the defending champion and is playing as well as any of the favorites. He is ranked second in the world and if not for a collapse in the final round of the Arnold Palmer Invitational he would be ranked number one.  He has made the cut 10 times in 12 starts in the Masters with one win.

Phil Mickelson
Mickelson has had his share of health issues as well and he has also not played well this year. He has been really good at the Masters though with three career wins.  He can never be counted out but he is probably overvalued in Masters betting odds.

Other Contenders
After the top four you can go pretty deep on the list of contenders who could win the Masters.  Dustin Johnson and Jason Day are next on the Masters odds board at about 16-1. They are followed by Bubba Watson who won in 2012, defending FedEx Cup champion Henrik Stenson, Justin Rose, Zach Johnson and reigning Rookie of the Year Jordan Spieth.  You can also put Matt Kuchar, Brandt Snedeker, Charl Schwartzel, Keegan Bradley and Sergio Garcia into the contender category.

Live Longshots
Everyone else in the field is listed at 40-1 or more including live longshots Patrick Reed, Jimmy Walker, Graeme McDowell, Jason Dufner, Harris English and Luke Donald. The Masters is one of the best tournaments of the year to bet longshots because of the excellent golf betting value.  You can get someone like Jason Dufner at odds of 50-1 to win the Masters or a player like Jim Furyk at 100-1.

The Complete Guide To Masters Odds and Betting

The first week of every April the Golf universe descends upon Georgia’s Augusta National Golf Club for the most sought after prize in the sport. This is the first Major Golf Tournament on the schedule and the only one that is played on the same course every year. The US Masters is an official “Major” Golf Tournament stop for the PGA, European, and Japanese professional tours. The 8 Million Dollar prize pool makes the Masters one of the Sport’s richest purses and winning the Masters is a career changing event that earns winners a place in the Sport’s history books.

The tournament itself was initiated by Golf’s biggest legend Bobby Jones. He helped to design the famous par 72 course and inaugurated the now world famous tournament in 1934. This play by invitation only event ensures competition at the highest level. The event is filled with tradition and lore as a place where Golf’s biggest names and brightest stars have notched their own place in history.

The defending 2012 US Masters Tournament Champion is Bubba Watson. The list of champions is a who’s who in the sport of golf. Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson are currently active players who have won this prestigious tournament multiple times. The first official Masters Tournament began on March 22, 1934, and was won by Horton Smith. Since then Golf legends such as Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus, and Sam Snead have all shared multiple victories at Augusta over the course of their careers. Nicklaus has won more Masters Tournaments than any other golfer with six Green Jackets under his belt. Other multiple winners include Arnold Palmer and Tiger Woods, with four title wins each. Jimmy Demaret, Sam Snead, Gary Player, Nick Faldo and Phil Mickelson all have three title wins to their names.

The Masters is the first Major of the season and since 1940 the tournament has been played so that the final round date always falls on the second Sunday each April.

The Masters is comprised of four rounds, with round 1 play starting on Thursday, Round 2 is played on Friday, Round 3 is played on Saturday, and the last and 4th Round is played on Sunday. Compared to other golf tournament venues The Masters has a small field of elite players. The world’s top 50 get an invite and players who have performed well on the tour winning or placing in other events may also get an invitation. Due to the small size of the field in contrast to the other Major golf tournaments, playing groups are set in three’s for the first two rounds and the field is not split to start on the 1st and 10th tees. After rounds 1 and 2 are completed, the cut off score is set and eliminations are made. The cut established is either the top 44 places or if a player is within 10 strokes of the leader's score. Following the cut, rounds 3 and 4 are played over the final two days. Should the final round fail to produce a winner, all players who are tied for the lead enter a sudden-death round that is played until a lone winner is decided.

If you’re going to be betting on The Masters, you should note that the field here tends to be very competitive. While it’s not always the biggest field in regards to quantity, it’s one of the toughest in regards to golf betting for quality. The tournament organizers have plenty of restrictions on who is invited to participate, which ensures a competitive field.

For golf betting purposes in regards to picking a winner, bettors should be looking for a player that excels at driving the ball. Augusta tends to be one of the longer courses on the PGA Tour and players who can drive the ball further have a higher tendency of winning.

The sport of golf has roots dating back to the 15th century and nowadays, it’s one of the most popular sports in the world. Naturally, betting on the game has been a big hit ever since the clubbing started. Each week, golf odds makers are busy setting lines on different golfers at different courses, and bettors are lining up to take advantage of the action.

Whether you’re a rookie who’s just getting in or a veteran who’s looking for that extra edge, we’ve compiled a complete guide on golf betting that will help you win.

The Masters Odds: Top 10 Finish Masters Betting Options

One of the many Masters betting props on the board is prediction a golfer to finish in the Top 10. That means his or her final ranking on The Masters leaderboard has to be in the top 10 positions.
Betting a golfer to finish in the Top 10 has a narrower window for success than making the cut because roughly half of the field makes the cut whereas a much smaller amount finish in the Top 10. That being the case, The Masters odds makers will pay you sizably more with this prop bet than they would betting a golfer to make the cut.
Handicappers love this prop because sometimes it’s hard to predict the exact winner of a tournament but often times – based on history or previous success – it’s easier to see who is more likely to have success on a specific course. Also, certain players do a great job of buzzing near the top of the leaderboard but struggle to close. Hence, this is a way you can still cash in on The Masters odds on some of those players who are having success but are falling just short of winning the actual tournament.
The PGA Tour keeps stats on Top 10 finishes, so that can give you a good indication as to who might be a good pick with this prop.

The Masters Odds: Win The Tournament Masters Betting Options

If you’re Masters betting action is on a player to win the tournament, you’re margin for error is quite small but this is without question your chance at the biggest payout on The Masters odds. The math is quite simple: for a player to win, they have to make the cut, finish in the Top 10 and beat everyone in the field. That means the payout for a player to win be much bigger than it would for the previous two Masters betting props.
While this might seem like picking a needle out of a haystack, the truth is that there is a science to it. Certain golfers excel on certain courses. For example: players who do well with the putter will thrive on shorter courses where there are challenging greens. Courses that play long will put a premium on driving, which means hard-hitters will excel on those courses. Also, there are courses where chipping and iron-play is crucial, so those who thrive with those clubs will perform better on those courses. You can get some great insight from the stats on the official PGA Tour website to see who is best at driving distance, greens in regulation and strokes gained (putting).
Once you start putting the pieces together, you can get a good idea of who is a good Masters Betting pick based on The Masters odds for this 2014 event and who is better to avoid. The best part is that since the Masters odds makers payout a nice price for each player, you can even bet on two or three and still take home a big ransom if one of them comes through.

The Masters Odds: Head-to-Head Masters Betting Matchups

Everyone’s favorite golf betting prop is the head-to-head matchups. Those wagering on the golf odds can take a look at a big list of head-to-head golfer matchups for each tournament and then bet on the golfer they believe will finish with the better score.
If you’re going to focus your Masters betting on this type of prop, there are a couple of key factors to take into account. For starters, you’ll want to check out each player’s history on the course. For example, some players will thrive at a specific course over and over again. If you see a pattern of a player finishing well, then you’ll want to bet them.
Next, you’ll want to evaluate how the course plays. If the head-to-head matchup features one player who is a conservative player and one who is a risky gambler, these two players will succeed on different types courses. Cross-reference that with the type of course and that will give you some insight as to where to invest on The Masters odds.
Regardless of who you bet on using The Masters odds, head-to-head matchups are great because they make watching the event so much more fun.

The Masters Odds: Live Betting

Masters Live betting is one of the best ways to take advantage of dynamic Masters odds. Before the innovation with the internet and technology, people doing their golf betting would have to lay all of their bets before the tournament started or in between the rounds of action. However, Masters live betting allows people wagering on the event to take advantage of the golf odds during the tournament as its taking place.
Masters Live betting offers some great advantages as you can watch the Masters Odds change as the action happens – in between holes and shots – and assess who you think will win the round, make the cut or even win the tournament. If you see a golfer performing very well in the second or third round, you can take advantage of his Masters odds right away.
Watch the action as it’s going down and then make your decisions. Live betting gives you the opportunity to take in some evidence before making your Masters betting decisions. Not only is it fun to bet on The Masters as it happens, it’s a good way to make money as your basing your decisions on how the players are performing.

The Masters Odds: Making The Cut Masters Betting Options

One of the most popular Masters betting props is predicting which golfers will make the cut. Almost all tournaments on the PGA Tour have a cut after the first two rounds.
If you’re wondering what exactly the cut is, it refers to the elimination of (roughly) the lower half of the field in a stroke-play event. So at the mid-point of the tournament, which is 36 holes in a four-day tournament, the players who have the best scores continue but the players who are in the lower half of the field go home. Technically speaking, a cut can be made at any point in the tournament – and some tournaments have more than one cut – so make sure you’re familiar with the specifics when you’re examining the golf odds. Different tournaments have different rules for how the cut line is calculated. For example, on the European Tour, the top 65 players plus ties advance. On other tours and other tournaments, that can change. The vast majority of the time, the cut happens after two rounds of play with about half the field being chopped.
So if you’re doing some golf betting and laying down the action on a golfer to make the cut, you believe the player you are betting on will not get cut. Golf odds makers know that this is a safer bet than, say, predicting who will win the tournament because a lot more players are going to make the cut whereas only one will win the tournament. From a bettor’s standpoint, this is considered a fairly conservative golf betting selection, so you won’t get a big payout back on the golf odds. However, it’s a safe play that tends to have a higher probability of winning.

Year

Champion

Country

To par

Margin of
victory

Winner's
share (

$

)

2012

Bubba Watson

 United States

−10

Playoff (2)

1,440,000

2011

Charl Schwartzel

 South Africa

−14

2

1,440,000

2010

Phil Mickelson (3)

 United States

−16

3

1,350,000

2009

Ángel Cabrera

 Argentina

−12

Playoff (3)

1,350,000

2008

Trevor Immelman

 South Africa

−8

3

1,350,000

2007

Zach Johnson

 United States

+1

2

1,305,000

2006

Phil Mickelson (2)

 United States

−7

2

1,260,000

2005

Tiger Woods (4)

 United States

−12

Playoff (2)

1,260,000

2004

Phil Mickelson

 United States

−9

1

1,117,000

2003

Mike Weir

 Canada

−7

Playoff (2)

1,080,000

2002

Tiger Woods (3)

 United States

−12

3

1,008,000

2001

Tiger Woods (2)

 United States

−16

2

1,008,000

2000

Vijay Singh

 Fiji

−10

3

828,000

1999

José María Olazábal (2)

 Spain

−8

2

720,000

1998

Mark O'Meara

 United States

−9

1

576,000

1997

Tiger Woods

 United States

−18

12

486,000

1996

Nick Faldo (3)

 England

−12

5

450,000

1995

Ben Crenshaw (2)

 United States

−14

1

396,000

1994

José María Olazábal

 Spain

−9

2

360,000

1993

Bernhard Langer (2)

  Germany

−11

4

306,000

1992

Fred Couples

 United States

−13

2

270,000

1991

Ian Woosnam

 Wales

−11

1

243,000

1990

Nick Faldo (2)

 England

−10

Playoff (2)

225,000

1989

Nick Faldo

 England

−5

Playoff (2)

200,000

1988

Sandy Lyle

 Scotland

−7

1

183,800

1987

Larry Mize

 United States

−3

Playoff (3)

162,000

1986

Jack Nicklaus (6)

 United States

−9

1

144,000

1985

Bernhard Langer

 West Germany

−6

2

126,000

1984

Ben Crenshaw

 United States

−11

2

108,000

1983

Seve Ballesteros (2)

 Spain

−8

4

90,000

1982

Craig Stadler

 United States

−4

Playoff (2)

64,000

1981

Tom Watson (2)

 United States

−8

2

60,000

1980

Seve Ballesteros

 Spain

−13

4

55,000

1979

Fuzzy Zoeller

 United States

−8

Playoff (3)

50,000

1978

Gary Player (3)

 South Africa

−11

1

45,000

1977

Tom Watson

 United States

−12

2

40,000

1976

Raymond Floyd

 United States

−17

8

40,000

1975

Jack Nicklaus (5)

 United States

−12

1

40,000

Year

Champion

Country

To par

Margin of
victory

Winner's
share (

$

)

1974

Gary Player (2)

 South Africa

−10

2

35,000

1973

Tommy Aaron

 United States

−5

1

30,000

1972

Jack Nicklaus (4)

 United States

−2

3

25,000

1971

Charles Coody

 United States

−9

2

25,000

1970

Billy Casper

 United States

−9

Playoff (2)

25,000

1969

George Archer

 United States

−7

1

20,000

1968

Bob Goalby

 United States

−11

1

20,000

1967

Gay Brewer

 United States

−8

1

20,000

1966

Jack Nicklaus (3)

 United States

E

Playoff (3)

20,000

1965

Jack Nicklaus (2)

 United States

−17

9

20,000

1964

Arnold Palmer (4)

 United States

−12

6

20,000

1963

Jack Nicklaus

 United States

−2

1

20,000

1962

Arnold Palmer (3)

 United States

−8

Playoff (3)

20,000

1961

Gary Player

 South Africa

−8

1

20,000

1960

Arnold Palmer (2)

 United States

−6

1

17,500

1959

Art Wall, Jr.

 United States

−4

1

15,000

1958

Arnold Palmer

 United States

−4

1

11,250

1957

Doug Ford

 United States

−5

3

8,750

1956

Jack Burke, Jr.

 United States

+1

1

6,000

1955

Cary Middlecoff

 United States

−9

7

5,000

1954

Sam Snead (3)

 United States

+1

Playoff (2)

5,000

1953

Ben Hogan (2)

 United States

−14

5

4,000

1952

Sam Snead (2)

 United States

−2

4

4,000

1951

Ben Hogan

 United States

−8

2

3,000

1950

Jimmy Demaret (3)

 United States

−5

2

2,400

1949

Sam Snead

 United States

−6

3

2,750

1948

Claude Harmon

 United States

−9

5

2,500

1947

Jimmy Demaret (2)

 United States

−7

2

2,500

1946

Herman Keiser

 United States

−6

1

2,500

1943–45: Cancelled due to World War II

1942

Byron Nelson (2)

 United States

−8

Playoff (2)

1,500

1941

Craig Wood

 United States

−8

3

1,500

1940

Jimmy Demaret

 United States

−8

4

1,500

1939

Ralph Guldahl

 United States

−9

1

1,500

1938

Henry Picard

 United States

−3

2

1,500

1937

Byron Nelson

 United States

−5

2

1,500

1936

Horton Smith (2)

 United States

−3

1

1,500

1935

Gene Sarazen

 United States

−6

Playoff (2)

1,500

1934

Horton Smith

 United States

−4

1

1,500

2013 Masters Golf Participants

  • Golf Master

    T.Bjorn


    Denmark

  • Golf Master

    K. Bradley


    United States

  • Golf Master

    A. Cabrera


    Argentina

  • Golf Master

    K.J. Choi


    Korea

  • Golf Master

    S. Cink


    United States

  • Golf Master

    T. Clark


    South Africa

  • Golf Master

    D. Clarke


    N. Ireland

  • Golf Master

    G. Coetzee


    South Africa

  • Golf Master

    N. Colsaerts


    Belgium

  • Golf Master

    F. Couples


    United States

  • Golf Master

    B. Crenshaw


    United States

  • Golf Master

    B. Curtis


    United States

  • Golf Master

    J. Day


    Australia

  • Golf Master

    L. Donald


    England

  • Golf Master

    J. Donaldson


    Wales

  • Golf Master

    J. Dufner


    United States

  • Golf Master

    A. Dunbar


    N. Ireland

  • Golf Master

    E. Els


    South Africa

  • Golf Master

    G. Fernandez


    Spain

  • Golf Master

    R. Fowler


    United States

  • Golf Master

    S. Fox


    United States

  • Golf Master

    H. Fujita


    Japan

  • Golf Master

    J. Furyk


    United States

  • Golf Master

    S. Garcia


    Spain

  • Golf Master

    R. Garrigus


    United States

  • Golf Master

    B. Gay


    United States

  • Golf Master

    L. Glover


    United States

  • Golf Master

    B. Grace


    South Africa

  • Golf Master

    T. Guan


    China

  • Golf Master

    B. Haas


    United States

  • Golf Master

    P. Hanson


    Sweden

  • Golf Master

    P. Harrington


    Ireland

  • Golf Master

    J. Huh


    United States

  • Golf Master

    T. Immelman


    South Africa

  • Golf Master

    R. Ishikawa


    Japan

  • Golf Master

    F. Jacobsen


    Sweden

  • Golf Master

    D. Johnson


    United States

  • Golf Master

    Z. Johnson


    United States

  • Golf Master

    M. Kaymer


    Germany

  • Golf Master

    M. Kuchar


    United States

  • Golf Master

    B. Langer


    Germany

  • Golf Master

    P. Lawrie


    Scotland

  • Golf Master

    M. Leishman


    Australia

  • Golf Master

    S. Lyle


    Scotland

  • Golf Master

    D. Lynn


    England

  • Golf Master

    H. Mahan


    United States

  • Golf Master

    M. Mannassero


    Italy

  • Golf Master

    G. McDowell


    N. Ireland

  • Golf Master

    R. McIlroy


    N. Ireland

  • Golf Master

    J. Merrick


    United States

  • Golf Master

    P. Mickelson


    United States

  • Golf Master

    L. Mize


    United States

  • Golf Master

    F. Molinari


    Italy

  • Golf Master

    R. Moore


    United States

  • Golf Master

    K. Na


    United States

  • Golf Master

    M. O'Meara


    United States

  • Golf Master

    J. Olazabal


    Spain

  • Golf Master

    T. Olesen


    Denmark

  • Golf Master

    L. Oosthuizen


    South Africa

  • Golf Master

    J. Peterson


    United States

  • Golf Master

    C. Petterson


    Sweden

  • Golf Master

    S. Piercy


    United States

  • Golf Master

    D.A. Points


    United States

  • Golf Master

    T. Potter, Jr.


    United States

  • Golf Master

    I. Poulter


    England

  • Golf Master

    J. Rose


    England

  • Golf Master

    C. Schwartzel


    South Africa

  • Golf Master

    A. Scott


    Australia

  • Golf Master

    J. Senden


    Australia

  • Golf Master

    W. Simpson


    United States

  • Golf Master

    V. Singh


    Fiji

  • Golf Master

    N. Smith


    United States

  • Golf Master

    B. Snedeker


    United States

  • Golf Master

    C. Stadler


    United States

  • Golf Master

    H. Stenson


    Sweden

  • Golf Master

    R. Sterne


    South Africa

  • Golf Master

    K. Streelman


    United States

  • Golf Master

    S. Stricker


    United States

  • Golf Master

    M. Thompson


    United States

  • Golf Master

    D. Toms


    United States

  • Golf Master

    B. Van Pelt


    United States

  • Golf Master

    T.J. Vogel


    United States

  • Golf Master

    N. Watney


    United States

  • Golf Master

    B. Watson


    United States

  • Golf Master

    T. Watson


    United States

  • Golf Master

    M. Weaver


    United States

  • Golf Master

    M. Weir


    Canada

  • Golf Master

    L. Westwood


    England

  • Golf Master

    T. Wiratchant


    Thailand

  • Golf Master

    T. Woods


    United States

  • Golf Master

    I. Woosnam


    Wales

  • Golf Master

    Y.E. Yang


    Korea

  • Golf Master

    R. Henley


    United States

The Other Majors

The sport of golf has events virtually every weekend of the year but there are four major tournaments that attract more attention than any others: The Majors. There are four in total and we’ve got a rundown of what they are all about. If you want to become a golf betting expert, you’ll want to know about the characteristics of each event and how to bet them.

U.S. Open

The United States Open (or the U.S. Open as it is more known as by golf betting sharps) is the second major of the golf season. As the name states, it is always played on American soil. You can usually find the U.S. Open falling on or around the Father’s Day weekend as organizers like the final round to fall on that Sunday to capture the holiday crowd.

The U.S. Open is thought to be the most difficult of all the majors as the United States Golf Association (the USGA) prefers to make the course very difficult. This tournament is known for its long rough, so driving accuracy is very important. Players have to hit the fairways or else they are going to have a long tournament. there are many players that prefer to use irons off the tee so they ensure that they’re hitting their approach shot from the fairways.

It’s not just the rough that’s tough; after that, the players will find themselves hitting into some of the most challenging greens in the world. The U.S. Open is sure to have greens that slope off at dastardly angles and with narrow paths to the hole. Renowned course designer, Rees Jones, has been tasked with the job of making changes to many courses so that they fit the label of a “U.S. Open” course.

The winner usually receives a large prize for coming out on top at the U.S. Open and it’ll probably be well over a million dollars (2012 winner Webb Simpson’s purse was $1.44 million out of a total purse of $8 million). The winner can also participate in the other three majors in professional golf for the next five years without having to qualify, which can turn out to be more valuable than the US Open winning purse. Players can also play in the Senior U.S. Open for five years after joining the Champions Tour as well as the Senior British Open for life.

A who’s who of golf greats head the list of U.S. Open winners as Jack Nicklaus, Ben Hogan, Bobby Jones and Willie Anderson have each won this event four times while modern-day golf betting favorite Tiger Woods has won it three times. Woods’ winning score of -12 at Pebble Beach in 2000 was also the lowest of all time until Rory McIlroy destroyed it with a sparkling -16 in 2012 at Congressional.

Golf betting handicappers can expect to see a relatively high score winning the U.S. Open. Since 2005, there have been five winning scores equal to par or higher, so keep that in mind as you’re looking through the golf odds for this tournament. The biggest thing to note when betting a U.S. Open course is to look for golfers who are good at minimizing their mistakes and taking their pars, which are as good as birdies on regular courses because the way they are designed. Conservative and accurate players are reward while risk-takers tend to get punished.

The cream of the golf-odds crop usually rises to the top at the U.S. Open but the players that avoid the double-and-triple bogeys are the ones that will go on to lift the U.S. Open trophy when this grueling tournament is finished.

The British Open (also referred to as The Open)

When you head to golf betting lines for the third major championship of the season, you will see either “The British Open”, which is what it is called in North America or “The Open Championship”, which is what you will hear everywhere else.  Either way, you’ll be preparing to wager on the oldest of the major championships in golf and the only major that is held outside of the United States. Like the U.S. Open and PGA Championship (and unlike the Masters), the British Open is rotated between a number of courses in England and Scotland.

The most unique aspect of the British Open is that you’ll have to familiarize yourself with is that this tournament is played on links-style courses. Links courses are different from most courses in the United States in that they’re played along a coast and there is usually lots of danger in the form of sand and wind. The wind can play a lot of havoc with the British Open and players that can keep the flight of their ball down will have the best chance of paying off in your golf odds. Then you also have the bunkers that usually litter British Open courses, notably at St. Andrews in Scotland, where the pot bunkers are legendary. The fairways aren’t going to be even and hitting them with the wind is usually a daunting task. Also, links courses are usually designed so that you have to play with the wind at your back going out and then coming at you when you’re trying to finish (or vice versa). Either way, you’re playing the wind twice.

Winners of the British Open will usually receive a large sum of money (in 2012, Ernie Els’ winning prize was just short of a million dollars) but they’ll also receive the Claret Jug, which one of the most recognizable trophies in all of sports. But that isn’t all as the amateurs also receive awards; the Silver medal is for the amateur with the best finishing score while the Bronze is given to all other amateurs that play in the final round. These players are usually longshots when it comes to golf odds as no amateur has won the British Open since the great Bobby Jones way back in 1930.

Harry Vardon holds the crown with six British Open wins, although the most recent came in 1914. When it comes to names that more modern golf betting players know, Tom Watson is the leader with five wins and his heartbreaking second-place finish to Stewart Cink in 2009 is a story for the ages. Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods, Nick Faldo and the late Seve Ballesteros have each lifted the Claret Jug three times. Woods’ -19 in 2000 is still the best score ever in this event.

For golf betting purposes, look for creative players as they usually fare well at the British Open. Links golf requires players to hit shots that players don’t normally hit in the United States. Whoever can come up with those shots (especially around the green) and control the flight of their ball has the best chance of taking the British Open.

PGA Championship

The PGA Championship is the final major championship of the season and even though it doesn’t have the tradition of the first three majors, it is still a fun tournament for golf betting sharps to bet on. It’s sometimes challenging to handicap because the PGA Championship doesn’t have the characteristics of the other majors.

For example, the Masters is always held at Augusta National, the U.S. Open is held on courses that put a premium on driving the ball accurately as to avoid the “Open rough” that gets players in trouble (don’t forget about the undulating greens) and the British Open is played on links courses known for its wind and bunkers. The PGA Championship is kind of a combination of the three, which means the golf odds for this tournament can be all over the place. You never really know what you’re going to get in regards to the course. It’s unlikely bettors will see ridiculously low scores winning the PGA Championship but they also won’t see high scores like at the U.S. Open.

As with other majors, the winner usually receives an exemption to the rest of the majors when they win the PGA Championship as well as a hefty sum of money (the purse in 2012 was $8 million and winner Rory McIlroy took home $1.445 million). The winner also gets to lift the Wanamaker Trophy, which is one of the most recognizable trophies in the game. They also get to keep it for a year before receiving a smaller version.

Jack Nicklaus holds the record with five wins in the PGA Championship, which switched from a match-play event to stroke play back in 1958. Meanwhile Tiger Woods has four wins under his belt. However, that doesn’t mean that golf betting players should solely bet on the favorites at the PGA Championship as underdogs love to get into the mix on the weekend. There have been a few big upsets in recent years, such as Y.E. Yang in 2009, Rich Beem in 2002 and Shaun Micheel in 2003. The favorites usually step up in the other three tournaments but if you were to look at the underdogs in one of the four golf majors, this would be it.

As you’re looking over the golf odds for the PGA Championship, do some hard research on the type of course, which changes from year to year. At least with the other three majors, there is a bit of a template in how it plays (and as for Augusta, it never changes all that much). But the course rotation at the PGA Championship is a mixed bag and that will really tell you who to wager on. Expect to see the favorites rise to the top of the list in the lines but don’t be surprised to see an underdog make a Sunday surge for the Wanamaker at the PGA Championship.

The Masters list of Tournament winners is as follows: